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Microtechniques [Micro- and Biomechanical Engineering] (BEAMS-µTech-Biomech)
Faculté des Sciences appliquées - école polytechnique / Brussels School of Engineering (Faculty of Applied Sciences) - Electromécanique (unité ULB671)

Voir description anglaise. [The Micro and Biomechanical Engineering Research Unit has gathered expertise in mechanical design from micro to macro scale. Our interests are focused on fundamental aspects related to micromechanics and precision mechanics, microfluidics, surface tension effects and mechanical design of miniaturized products and to biomechanics, such as experimental and numerical analysis of the human joints and patient specific modeling.This knowledge has been applied to several application frameworks:1. Micro-assembly and packaging (design of capillary grippers, non-contact handling of components with acoustic levitation...)2. Microfluidics (capillary forces, droplets generation by liquid dielectrophoresis, axial and lateral dynamics of liquid bridges...)3. Microrobotics (flexible fluidic actuators, bubble robotics, force sensors...)4. Surface science (capillary condensation, electrostatic adhesion, capillary adhesion in granular media...)5. Medical devices design (Therapeutic and Diagnostic Tools for flexible endoscopy, force sensors, microneedles...)6. Dynamics and vibrations, interferometric sensors7. Kinematics and the kinetics analysis of human joints in healthy and replaced conditions;8. Stress distribution in bone and implant9. Numerical prediction of bone remodeling and wearPrevious and ongoing projects are related to drug delivery, medical devices, watch industry, packaging industry, droplets generation, acoustic levitation, knee and hand modeling, effect of implant malposition in a joint. The group is led by three Professors: Prof. Alain Delchambre, Prof. Bernardo Innocenti and Prof. Pierre Lambert.The research unit is involved in the Belgian IAP project MicroMAST (www.micromast.be) on Microfluidics and Microanipulation: Multiscale Applications of Surface Tension]



coordonnées / contact details


Microtechniques [Micro- and Biomechanical Engineering]
tel +32-2-650.31.61, fax +32-2-650.24.82, acmuffat@ulb.ac.be
http://beams.ulb.ac.be/beams/
Campus du Solbosch, UB3
CP165/56, avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, 1050 Bruxelles

Pour en savoir plus, consultez le site web de l'unité.



responsables / head


Prof. Pierre LAMBERT Bernardo INNOCENTI Prof. Alain DELCHAMBRE


composition / members


Laure BODENGHIEN Nicolas CAUCHE Christophe COLLETTE Benjamin CONRADT Gustav FEKETE Sophie GERNAY Jean-Charles LARRIEU Massimo MASTRANGELI Jean-Salvatore MELE Benjamin MERTENS Silvia PIANIGI Marion SAUSSE-LHERNOULD Ronald TERRAZAS MALLEA David TSHILUMBA Jean-Baptiste VALSAMIS


projets / projects


IAP 7/38 MicroMAST, Micromanipulation and Microfluidics: Multiscale Applications of Surface Tension [IAP 7/38 MicroMAST, Micromanipulation and Microfluidics: Multiscale Applications of Surface Tension]
The scientific objectives of this network are driven by fundamental questions raised in microfluidics, interfacial science, and micromanipulation. The rational use of surface tension, surface stress and capillary effects in micromanipulation will be applied to a selected number of highly relevant case studies by the network partners, including capillary gripping, capillary filling, capillary alignment, capillary sealing, capillary self-assembly and droplet manipulation. These fundamental questions can be grouped into three categories: 1. Fluid statics and dynamics: How much force is applied on solids by menisci and micro-flows in a given geometry? What happens if the solid bends when subject to these forces? Are the interfaces stable and what if not? What is the effect of an electric field? How can the microscopic description of wetting be translated into an adequate boundary condition at the macroscopic level? 2. Surface engineering: How does a contact line move on a rough surface? Can one pattern the surface microscopically to control this motion? How is the motion affected by evaporation, or by the presence of colloid particles in the liquid or at the interface? Do these particles interact with the micro-patterns on the surface? Can one create highly 3D patterns on the surface by using capillary forces? 3. Liquid engineering: How to measure the interfacial properties of complex liquids where apart from surface tension a surface viscoelastic response is present? How to infer macroscopic properties from the dynamics at the molecular scale? And how to engineer liquids and tailor them to the requirements arising from applications? Can one make a liquid that is biocompatible, and has a large surface tension and a low viscosity? The proposed program is highly multidisciplinary, as it combines the forefront research in physics, material science, chemistry and engineering. It will cover topics that range from fundamental theory with atomistic simulations to experiments to investigate the fundamentals and selected more applied case studies. It will address both static and dynamic points of view, and establish the link between the microscopic properties of liquids and surfaces, and the macroscopic performances expected in the case studies. To that aim, this IAP project has gathered a multi-disciplinary research team that covers all the disciplines listed above. The originality of this network relies in the efforts to enhance the collaboration of both the interfacial science, microfluidics and microengineering communities. [The scientific objectives of this network are driven by fundamental questions raised in microfluidics, interfacial science, and micromanipulation. The rational use of surface tension, surface stress and capillary effects in micromanipulation will be applied to a selected number of highly relevant case studies by the network partners, including capillary gripping, capillary filling, capillary alignment, capillary sealing, capillary self-assembly and droplet manipulation. These fundamental questions can be grouped into three categories: 1. Fluid statics and dynamics: How much force is applied on solids by menisci and micro-flows in a given geometry? What happens if the solid bends when subject to these forces? Are the interfaces stable and what if not? What is the effect of an electric field? How can the microscopic description of wetting be translated into an adequate boundary condition at the macroscopic level? 2. Surface engineering: How does a contact line move on a rough surface? Can one pattern the surface microscopically to control this motion? How is the motion affected by evaporation, or by the presence of colloid particles in the liquid or at the interface? Do these particles interact with the micro-patterns on the surface? Can one create highly 3D patterns on the surface by using capillary forces? 3. Liquid engineering: How to measure the interfacial properties of complex liquids where apart from surface tension a surface viscoelastic response is present? How to infer macroscopic properties from the dynamics at the molecular scale? And how to engineer liquids and tailor them to the requirements arising from applications? Can one make a liquid that is biocompatible, and has a large surface tension and a low viscosity? The proposed program is highly multidisciplinary, as it combines the forefront research in physics, material science, chemistry and engineering. It will cover topics that range from fundamental theory with atomistic simulations to experiments to investigate the fundamentals and selected more applied case studies. It will address both static and dynamic points of view, and establish the link between the microscopic properties of liquids and surfaces, and the macroscopic performances expected in the case studies. To that aim, this IAP project has gathered a multi-disciplinary research team that covers all the disciplines listed above. The originality of this network relies in the efforts to enhance the collaboration of both the interfacial science, microfluidics and microengineering communities.]

Stratégies d'isolation active [Active Vibration Isolation]
L'objectif de ce projet est de développer des nouvelles stratégies permettant d'isoler activement les futurs instruments dédiés à la physique expérimentale (tels que les collisionneurs de particules et les grands détecteurs d'ondes gravitationnelles) des perturbations environnementales. [The objective of this project is to develop active vibration isolation strategies to stabilize large future instruments dedicated to experimental physics, like particle collider, gravitational wave detectors. ]

Mini Micro Nano Project [Mini Micro Nano Project]
A new field of interest is the use of metallic materials in MEMS applications because of their interesting mechanical and wear properties. The objective of the Mini Micro Nano Project is to create a center of excellence in the field of micromechanical engineering with the cooperation of three ULB partners: the CAD-CAM, the Structural and Material Computational Mechanics and the Industrial Chemistry departments.The nanoscale world obeys to different rules than the macroscopic one. Due to the extreme down-scaling many practical problems are encountered in microhandling of small parts. These problems must be studied and solved in order to be able to design and produce reliable micromechanical tools. The CAD-CAM department is in charge of the development of a tool for surface interactions to be able to take into account the surface forces (that are of the outmost importance at nanoscale) for manipulator design and for the development of handling strategies.At small scales the behavior of materials changes significantly with respect to the bulk material at macro-scale, which leaves many unanswered questions. The Structural and Material Computational Mechanics Department is responsible for modeling the mechanical response of materials at nanoscale using appropriate theories to pass from the bulk material parameters to the nanoscale behavior.The previous tasks need inputs from special experiments. The practical research results must also be validated later on. The Industrial Chemistry Department brings its expertise in experimental characterization of materials and performs thorough chemical and physical characterization of materials and surfaces.The project will span five years, with the participation of three PhD students attached to the fore-mentioned three departments during four years and one post-doctoral fellow for the last two years. [A new field of interest is the use of metallic materials in MEMS applications because of their interesting mechanical and wear properties. The objective of the Mini Micro Nano Project is to create a center of excellence in the field of micromechanical engineering with the cooperation of three ULB partners: the CAD-CAM, the Structural and Material Computational Mechanics and the Industrial Chemistry departments.The nanoscale world obeys to different rules than the macroscopic one. Due to the extreme down-scaling many practical problems are encountered in microhandling of small parts. These problems must be studied and solved in order to be able to design and produce reliable micromechanical tools. The CAD-CAM department is in charge of the development of a tool for surface interactions to be able to take into account the surface forces (that are of the outmost importance at nanoscale) for manipulator design and for the development of handling strategies.At small scales the behavior of materials changes significantly with respect to the bulk material at macro-scale, which leaves many unanswered questions. The Structural and Material Computational Mechanics Department is responsible for modeling the mechanical response of materials at nanoscale using appropriate theories to pass from the bulk material parameters to the nanoscale behavior.The previous tasks need inputs from special experiments. The practical research results must also be validated later on. The Industrial Chemistry Department brings its expertise in experimental characterization of materials and performs thorough chemical and physical characterization of materials and surfaces.The project will span five years, with the participation of three PhD students attached to the fore-mentioned three departments during four years and one post-doctoral fellow for the last two years.]

Neofor
Technological platform for advanced pulmonary delivery of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients [Technological platform for advanced pulmonary delivery of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients]

Endomina
Endomina

Piercendo
Piercendo

Remaid
Réseaux de micro-aiguilles [Microneedles arrays]



publications





theses


Jean-Baptiste VALSAMIS, 2010

Cyrille LENDERS, 2010

Aline DE GREEF, 2010

Vincent VANDAELE, Contactless handling for micro-assembly: acoustic levitation, 2008

Marion SAUSSE-LHERNOULD, Theoretical and experimental study of electrostatic forces applied to micromanipulation: influence of surface topography, 2008

Alexandre CHAU, Theoretical and experimental study of capillary condensation and of its possible use in micro-assembly - Etude théorique et expérimentale des forces dues à la condensation capillaire, 2007

Pierre LAMBERT, A Contribution to Microassembly: a Study of Capillary Forces as a gripping Principle, 2004



collaborations


Prof. Jacques Jacot, EPFL, Laboratoire de Production Microtechnique, Lausanne, Suisse

Prof. Stéphane Régnier, UPMC, Laboratoire de Robotique de Paris, Paris, France

Prof. Nicolas Chaillet, FEMTO-ST, Besançon, France

Prof. Marcel Tichem, TU Delft, Delft, Pays-Bas

Sjef van Gastel, Assembléon, Veldhoven, Pays-Bas

Prof. Hiroyuki Fujita, University of Tokyo, Fujita lab, Tokyo, Japon

Dr Ir Charles Beumier, Royal military academy, Signal and Image Centre, Brussels, Belgique

Gari Arutinov, Holst/TNO, Eindhoven, Pays-Bas

Valentin Flauraud, EPFL, Microsystems Laboratory (LMIS1), Lausanne, Suisse

Ir. Kurt Artoos, CERN, Engineering, Geneva, Suisse

Dr. Fabrice Matichard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, LIGO Lab, Cambridge, Etats-Unis (USA)

Ir. Marco Oriunno, Stanford Linear Accelerator, Engineering, Stanford, Etats-Unis (USA)

Dr. Brian Lantz, Stanford University, Ginzton lab, Stanford, Etats-Unis (USA)

Dr. Brian Lantz, Stanford University, Ginzton lab, Stanford, Etats-Unis (USA)

Dr. Jacques Deviere, ULB Erasme, Service de gastro-entérologie, Brussels, Belgique

Jean-Paul Belgrado, ULB, Lymphology Research Unit, Brussels, Belgique

Prof. Véronique Préat, UCL, FARG, Brussels, Belgique

Tristan Gilet, ULg, Microfluidics Laboratory, Liège, Belgique

Walter Federle, University of Cambridge, Insect Biomechanics Workgroug, Cambridge,

Prof. Jos Vander Sloten, KULeuven, Biomechanics section, Leuven, Belgique

Prof. Giuliano Cerulli, Let People Move Research Institute, Arezzo, Italie

Prof. Fabio Catani, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department, Modena, Italie

Prof. Johan Bellemans, KULeuven, Department of Orthopaedic, Leuven, Belgique

Prof. Walter Pascale, Galeazzi Hospital, Milano, Italie

Prof Quan Zhou, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finlande



prix / awards


Emerald Literati Award (Pierre Lambert) - Pierre LAMBERT

Best paper award IEEE Biomedical Engineering Benelux 2012 - Nicolas CAUCHE

Prix André Jaumotte - David TSHILUMBA

Best Poster Award - ESSKA - Bernardo INNOCENTI

Richard Laskin Awarda - Bernardo INNOCENTI

Marc Coventry Award - Bernardo INNOCENTI

Second stage of the ERC starting grant (2007) - Pierre LAMBERT

Paper on acoustic levitation highlighted in Physics Today (September 2011) - Pierre LAMBERT

Paper highlighted in top 25 papers, Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (2011) - Pierre LAMBERT



savoir-faire/équipements / know-how, equipment


Logiciels de CAO (CATIA, solidworks), de prototypage (Matlab), de simulation multiphysique (Comsol), de calcul numérique (Abaqus)Capteurs de déplacement sans contact (6mm de course, précision de 200nm / 1 mm de course et 10nm de précision)Caméra haute cadence (100kH)Caméra CCDAxe nanométrique (course de 200µm, répétabilité 10nm)Banc de mesure de forces jusqu'à 10µN (limite basse)



mots clés pour non-spécialistes / keywords for non-specialists


biomécanique mécanique de précision microfluidique micromécanique tension de surface


disciplines et mots clés / disciplines and keywords


Automatisme et régulation Ingénierie biomédicale Mécanique Médecine chirurgicale Sciences biomédicales Sciences de l'ingénieur

capillary forces electrospray endoscopy etats de surface forces électrostatiques large instruments mechanics mechatronics microfluidics micromanipulation microneedles modélisation surface tension transdermal injection vibration control


codes technologiques DGTRE


Automatisation, robotique, techniques et régularisation Biomécanique, cybernétique Instrumentation Mécanique appliquée, hydraulique, technologie du vide, vibrations, acoustique appliquée Technologie médicale